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In March 2012, an ABC News series about "pink slime" included claims that approximately 70% of ground beef sold in US supermarkets contained the additive at that time.

Some companies and organizations stopped offering ground beef with the product.

On September 13, 2012, BPI announced that it filed a

In March 2012, an ABC News series about "pink slime" included claims that approximately 70% of ground beef sold in US supermarkets contained the additive at that time.Some companies and organizations stopped offering ground beef with the product.On September 13, 2012, BPI announced that it filed a $1.2 billion lawsuit, Beef Products, Inc. American Broadcasting Companies, Inc., against ABC News; three reporters (Diane Sawyer, Jim Avila and David Kerley) and others, claiming ABC News made nearly "200 false, misleading and defamatory statements, repeated continuously during a month-long disinformation campaign", engaged in "product and food disparagement, and tortious interference with business relationships".BPI called the ABC News series a "concerted disinformation campaign" against LFTB.BPI said it lost contracts with 72 customers, many over the course of one weekend, and production decreased from 5 million pounds of LFTB per week to below one million pounds a week at the nadir (lowest point of production). cattle futures on the Chicago Mercantile Exchange were at a 3.5-month low, which was partially attributed to the "pink slime" controversy.About 80% of sales of the product evaporated "overnight" in 2012, per the president of Cargill Beef. states declined to purchase any of the product for the 2012–2013 school year while South Dakota Department of Education, Nebraska, and Iowa chose to continue buying it. Livestock traders stated that: "It has put a dent in demand.

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In March 2012, an ABC News series about "pink slime" included claims that approximately 70% of ground beef sold in US supermarkets contained the additive at that time.

Some companies and organizations stopped offering ground beef with the product.

On September 13, 2012, BPI announced that it filed a $1.2 billion lawsuit, Beef Products, Inc. American Broadcasting Companies, Inc., against ABC News; three reporters (Diane Sawyer, Jim Avila and David Kerley) and others, claiming ABC News made nearly "200 false, misleading and defamatory statements, repeated continuously during a month-long disinformation campaign", engaged in "product and food disparagement, and tortious interference with business relationships".

BPI called the ABC News series a "concerted disinformation campaign" against LFTB.

BPI said it lost contracts with 72 customers, many over the course of one weekend, and production decreased from 5 million pounds of LFTB per week to below one million pounds a week at the nadir (lowest point of production). cattle futures on the Chicago Mercantile Exchange were at a 3.5-month low, which was partially attributed to the "pink slime" controversy.

About 80% of sales of the product evaporated "overnight" in 2012, per the president of Cargill Beef. states declined to purchase any of the product for the 2012–2013 school year while South Dakota Department of Education, Nebraska, and Iowa chose to continue buying it. Livestock traders stated that: "It has put a dent in demand.

.2 billion lawsuit, Beef Products, Inc. American Broadcasting Companies, Inc., against ABC News; three reporters (Diane Sawyer, Jim Avila and David Kerley) and others, claiming ABC News made nearly "200 false, misleading and defamatory statements, repeated continuously during a month-long disinformation campaign", engaged in "product and food disparagement, and tortious interference with business relationships".

BPI called the ABC News series a "concerted disinformation campaign" against LFTB.

BPI said it lost contracts with 72 customers, many over the course of one weekend, and production decreased from 5 million pounds of LFTB per week to below one million pounds a week at the nadir (lowest point of production). cattle futures on the Chicago Mercantile Exchange were at a 3.5-month low, which was partially attributed to the "pink slime" controversy.

About 80% of sales of the product evaporated "overnight" in 2012, per the president of Cargill Beef. states declined to purchase any of the product for the 2012–2013 school year while South Dakota Department of Education, Nebraska, and Iowa chose to continue buying it. Livestock traders stated that: "It has put a dent in demand.

The product is banned in Canada due to the presence of ammonia in it, and it is banned for human consumption in the European Union.After some parents and consumer advocates insisted the product be removed from public schools, the USDA indicated, beginning in fall 2012, that it would give school districts the choice between ground beef with or without LFTB.An analysis of California Department of Education data indicated that "anywhere from none to nearly 3 million pounds of beef from the USDA that was served in California schools last year could have contained lean finely textured beef".In 2002, a United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) microbiologist stated that the product contained connective tissue and that he did not consider it to be ground beef and that it was "not nutritionally equivalent" to ground beef.In 1990, the USDA's Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) approved the use of the technology for manufacturing finely textured meat.

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